Early Childhood Literacy

Early childhood literacy

1,000 Books Before Kindergarten

All children under the age of five can participate in this program. Read a book to your newborn, infant, and/or toddler. The goal is to have read 1,000 books before your precious one stars kindergarten. Does it sound hard? Not really if you think about it. If you read just 1 book a night, you will have read about 365 books in a year. That is 730 in two years and 1,095 books in three years. If you consider that most children start kindergarten at around 5 years of age, you have more time than you think.

Receive a free book once you have registered and read 1,000 books at https://clarksvillemontgomery.beanstack.com/reader365.

Why read aloud to very young children?

Children who are read to:

  • Discover that books are fun
  • Can become better listeners
  • Will understand the world better
  • Have a greater chance of succeeding in school
  • Get to cuddle with their favorite person: you!
  • Experience beautiful art in picture books
  • Approach learning to read with enthusiasm

Every Child Ready to Read @ Your Library

Here you will find:

  • A list of skills that will help you prepare your child to get ready to read in school.
  • Also, there are recommended books for appropriate formats such as board books, concept books, and wordless books.
  • Links to other fun literacy web sites

Skills

There are six skill areas that will help prepare your child to get ready to read in school.

LOVE BOOKS
Print motivation: being interested in and enjoying books.

USE BOOKS
Print awareness: understanding that print has meaning; noticing print everywhere, not just in books; and also knowing how to handle a book.

LEARN WORDS
Vocabulary: knowing the name of objects

SEE LETTERS
Letter knowledge: knowing that each letter looks different from any other; knowing the name of letters and sounds.

HEAR SOUNDS
Phonological sensitivity: being able to hear and play with the smaller sounds that make up words.

TELL A STORY
Narrative skills: being able to describe objects, people and events, and to tell stories about them.


Recommended Books for the Youngest Readers

Board Books
Ideal for exposing babies to books with short text and bright pictures, and a sturdy cardboard binding. 

Concept Books
This type of book is good for babies and toddlers to letters, numbers, shapes, and colors. 

Wordless Books
These books allow children who might not be able to read text but can “read” the pictures and still tell the story.


Reading Aloud Tips

  • Choose children's books that you enjoy
  • Read and reread your child's favorite books
  • Set aside a time every day, for reading aloud
  • Let your child participate in the story
  • Remember: enjoy the book, don't teach it
  • Read aloud even after your child learns how to read
  • Be a role model - let your child see you reading as well

Remember - Get your child a Library Card