MoCo COVID-19 Information Portal

Information from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) about the Coronavirus
Information from the TN Department of Health about the Coronavirus

Montgomery County Testing Site: 650 Bellamy Ln, Clarksville, TN 37043.

Hours of testing operation currently M-F 7am-12pm - Click here for Map

Small Business Resource Links and Articles
Additional COVID-19 Resources
Coronavirus Volunteer Sign up
Face-Covering Sign for Businesses

Montgomery County Government Coronavirus Press Releases and Information.

PREAMBLE

Pursuant to the authority in TCA 58-8-104, I, Montgomery County Mayor Jim Durrett, declared a State of Local Emergency on the 17th day of July 2020, granting to the County Mayor certain powers as allowed under TCA 58-2-110. This declaration gives political subdivisions of Tennessee State Government, Montgomery County, the ability to waive procedures relative to “performance of public works and taking whatever prudent action is necessary to ensure the health, safety and welfare of the community”. I then issued EMERGENCY ORDER #11 on the same date.

Pursuant to those same statutes, I extend that Declaration of a state of emergency and further so ORDER the mandates of EMERGENCY ORDER(s) #11, #12, and #13 for an additional seven days (7).

EMERGENCY ORDER # 14

  1. A Declaration of a State of Emergency for Montgomery County, Tennessee was made on July 17, 2020 and is hereby extended as allowed by law.
  2. Emergency Executive Order #13 of July 31, 2020 is extended and is adopted herein in full and extended as allowed by law.
  3. This ORDER shall become effective at 12:01 a.m. on the 10th day of August 2020 and will expire on August 17, 2020 at 12:01 a.m. unless sooner cancelled or unless extended.

It is so ORDERED, Mayor Jim Durrett, Montgomery County, Tennessee, this the 7th day of August 2020.

See official order here.

PREAMBLE

Pursuant to the authority in TCA 58-8-104, I, Montgomery County Mayor Jim Durrett, declared a State of Local Emergency on the 17th day of July 2020, granting to the County Mayor certain powers as allowed under TCA 58-2-110. This declaration gives political subdivisions of Tennessee State Government, Montgomery County, the ability to waive procedures relative to “performance of public works and taking whatever prudent action is necessary to ensure the health, safety and welfare of the community”. I then issued EMERGENCY ORDER #11 on the same date.

Pursuant to those same statutes, I extend that Declaration of a state of emergency and further so ORDER the mandates of EMERGENCY ORDER(s) #11 and #12 for an additional seven days (7).

EMERGENCY ORDER # 13

  1. A Declaration of a State of Emergency for Montgomery County, Tennessee was made on July 17, 2020 and is hereby extended as allowed by law.
  2. Emergency Executive Order #12 of July 24, 2020 is extended and is adopted herein in full and extended as allowed by law.
  3. This ORDER shall become effective at 12:01 a.m. on the 3rd day of August 2020 and will expire on August 10, 2020 at 12:01 a.m. unless sooner cancelled or unless extended.

It is so ORDERED, Mayor Jim Durrett, Montgomery County, Tennessee, this the 31st day of July 2020.

See official order here.

COVID-19 Workplace Admin Controls and Q & A

Administrative Controls for COVID

Administrative controls require action by the worker or employer. Typically, administrative controls are changes in work policy or procedures to reduce or minimize exposure to a hazard. Examples of administrative controls for SARS-CoV-2 include:

  • Encouraging sick workers to stay at home.
  • Minimizing contact among workers, clients, and customers by replacing face-to-face meetings with virtual communications and implementing telework if feasible.
  • Establishing alternating days or extra shifts that reduce the total number of employees in a facility at a given time, allowing them to maintain distance from one another while maintaining a full onsite work week.
  • Discontinuing nonessential travel to locations with ongoing COVID-19 outbreaks. Regularly check CDC travel warning levels at: www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/travelers.
  • Developing emergency communications plans, including a forum for answering workers’ concerns and internet-based communications, if feasible.
  • Providing workers with up-to-date education and training on COVID-19 risk factors and protective behaviors (e.g., cough etiquette and care of PPE).
  • Training workers who need to use protecting clothing and equipment how to put it on, use/wear it, and take it off correctly, including in the context of their current and potential duties. Training material should be easy to understand and available in the appropriate language and literacy level for all workers.
https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/community/general-business-faq.html

Suspected or Confirmed Cases of COVID-19 in the Workplace

  1. What should I do if an employee comes to work with COVID-19 symptoms?

    Employees who have symptoms when they arrive at work or become sick during the day should immediately be separated from other employees, customers, and visitors and sent home. Employees who develop symptoms outside of work should notify their supervisor and stay home.

    Sick employees should follow CDC-recommended steps to help prevent the spread of COVID-19. Employees should not return to work until they have met the criteria to discontinue home isolation and have consulted with a healthcare provider.

    Employers should not require sick employees to provide a COVID-19 test result or healthcare provider’s note to validate their illness, qualify for sick leave, or return to work. Healthcare provider offices and medical facilities may be extremely busy and not able to provide such documentation in a timely manner.

  2. What should I do if an employee is suspected or confirmed to have COVID-19?

    In most cases, you do not need to shut down your facility. But do close off any areas used for prolonged periods of time by the sick person:

    • Wait 24 hours before cleaning and disinfecting to minimize potential for other employees being exposed to respiratory droplets. If waiting 24 hours is not feasible, wait as long as possible.

    Follow the CDC cleaning and disinfection recommendations:

    • Clean dirty surfaces with soap and water before disinfecting them.
    • To disinfect surfaces, use products that meet EPA criteria for use against SARS-Cov-2external icon, the virus that causes COVID-19, and are appropriate for the surface.
    • Be sure to follow the instructions on the product labels to ensure safe and effective use of the product.
    • You may need to wear additional personal protective equipment (PPE) depending on the setting and disinfectant product you are using.

    In addition to cleaning and disinfecting, employers should determine which employees may have been exposed to the virus and need to take additional precautions:

    Sick employees should follow CDC-recommended steps. Employees should not return to work until they have met the criteria to discontinue home isolation and have consulted with a healthcare provider. Antibody test results should not be used to make decisions about returning persons to the workplace.

  3. If employees have been exposed but are not showing symptoms, should I allow them to work?

    Employees may have been exposed if they are a “close contact” of someone who is infected, which is defined as being within about 6 feet of a person with COVID-19 for a prolonged period of time:

    • Potentially exposed employees who have symptoms of COVID-19 should self-isolate and follow CDC recommended steps.
    • Potentially exposed employees who do not have symptoms should remain at home or in a comparable setting and practice social distancing for 14 days.
    • All other employees should self-monitor for symptoms and wear cloth face coverings when in public. If they develop symptoms, they should notify their supervisor and stay home.

      See Public Health Recommendations for Community-Related Exposure for more information.

      To ensure continuity of operations of essential functions, CDC advises that critical infrastructure icon may be permitted to continue work following potential exposure to COVID-19, provided they remain symptom-free and additional precautions are taken to protect them and the community.

    • Critical infrastructure businesses have an obligation to limit, to the extent possible, the reintegration into the worksite of in-person employees who have been exposed to COVID-19 but remain symptom-free in ways that best protect the health of the employee, their co-employees, and the general public.
      • Remaining at home for 14 days may still be the most preferred and viable option for exposed employees.
    • An analysis of core job tasks and workforce availability at worksites can allow the employer to match core activities to other equally skilled and available in-person employees who have not been exposed.
    • A critical infrastructure employee who is symptom-free and returns to work should wear a cloth face covering at all times while in the workplace for 14 days after last exposure. Employers can issue cloth face coverings or can approve employees’ supplied cloth face coverings in the event of shortages.
    • See Implementing Safety Practices for Critical Infrastructure Employees Who May Have Had Exposure to a Person with Suspected or Confirmed COVID-19 and COVID-19 Critical Infrastructure Sector Response Planning for more information.

  4. What testing does CDC recommend for employees in a workplace?

    CDC does NOT recommend that employers use antibody tests to determine which employees can work. Antibody tests check a blood sample for past infection with SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. CDC does not yet know if people who recover from COVID-19 can get infected again. Viral tests check a respiratory sample (such as swabs of the inside of the nose) for current infection with SARS-CoV-2.

    CDC has published strategies for consideration of incorporating viral testing for SARS-CoV-2 into a workplace COVID-19 preparedness, response, and control plan.

    Different states and jurisdictions may have their own guidance and priorities for viral testing in workplaces. Testing in the workplace could be arranged through a company’s occupational health provider or in consultation with the local or state health department.

  5. What should I do if I find out several days later, after an employee worked, that they were diagnosed with COVID-19?
    • If it has been less than 7 days since the sick employee used the facility, clean and disinfect all areas used by the sick employee following the CDC cleaning and disinfection recommendations.
    • If it has been 7 days or more since the sick employee used the facility, additional cleaning and disinfection is not necessary. Continue routinely cleaning and disinfecting all high-touch surfaces in the facility.
    • Other employees may have been exposed to the virus if they were in “close contact” (within approximately 6 feet) of the sick employee for a prolonged period of time.
      • If an employee is confirmed to have COVID-19, employers should inform fellow employees of their possible exposure to COVID-19 in the workplace but maintain confidentiality as required by the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).
      • Those who have symptoms should self-isolate and follow CDC recommended steps.
      • In most workplaces, those potentially exposed but with no symptoms should remain at home or in a comparable setting and practice social distancing for 14 days.
      • Critical infrastructure employees should follow Implementing Safety Practices for Critical Infrastructure Employees Who May Have Had Exposure to a Person with Suspected or Confirmed COVID-19. A critical infrastructure employee who is symptom-free and returns to work should wear a cloth face covering at all times while in the workplace for 14 days after last exposure. Employers can issue cloth face coverings or can approve employees’ supplied cloth face coverings in the event of shortages.
    • Employees not considered exposed should self-monitor for symptoms. If they develop symptoms, they should notify their supervisor and stay home.
  6. When should an employee suspected or confirmed to have COVID-19 return to work?

    Sick employees should follow steps to prevent the spread of COVID-19. Employees should not return to work until they meet the criteria to discontinue home isolation and have consulted with a healthcare provider.

    Employers should not require a sick employee to provide a negative COVID-19 test result or healthcare provider’s note to return to work. Employees with COVID-19 who have stayed home can stop home isolation and return to work when they have met one of the sets of criteria found here.

  7. What should I do if an employee has a respiratory illness?

    Employees who appear to have COVID-19 symptoms upon arrival to work or become sick during the day with COVID-19 symptoms should immediately be separated from other employees, customers, and visitors and sent home. Sick employees should follow steps to prevent the spread of COVID-19.

    CDC has a symptom self-checker chatbot that employers and employees may find helpful. It has a series of questions and recommends what level of medical care, if any, the user should seek. It is not intended to provide diagnosis or treatment.

  8. What does “acute” respiratory illness mean?

    “Acute” respiratory illness is an infection of the upper or lower respiratory tract that may interfere with normal breathing, such as COVID-19. “Acute” means of recent onset (for example, for a few days), and is used to distinguish from chronic respiratory illnesses like asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

  9. Are allergy symptoms considered an acute respiratory illness?

    No. Allergy symptoms are not considered an acute respiratory illness. However, there is some overlap between common seasonal allergy symptoms and some of the symptoms that have been reported by people with COVID-19 (e.g., headache, sneezing, cough). It is important to take into account whether an individual’s symptoms are compatible with the usual symptoms and timing for allergy in that person.

Q & A on Face-Coverings in Montgomery County

Am I required to wear a mask in Montgomery County?

Yes. Unless you meet one of the exceptions listed below, you are required to wear a mask. Montgomery County Mayor Jim Durrett signed Executive Order #11 requiring that all Clarksville, Montgomery County residents and visitors wear face coverings in public to mitigate the spread of COVID-19. The original order went into effect at 12:01 a.m. on July 20, 2020 and states that it is ordered that cloth or other face coverings that cover the nose and mouth of a person to impede the spread of the virus during speaking, coughing, sneezing or other action, shall be required in Montgomery County, Tennessee, within all publicly-accessible areas of commercial business establishments; public outdoor areas where social distancing of at least six feet cannot be maintained; and within publicly-accessible areas of business offices where there is direct interaction with the public and social distancing of at least six feet cannot be maintained. The order has been extended through August 3.

What are the exceptions for wearing a mask?

Exceptions under the executive order for wearing a mask are:

  • Any person who is of age 12 or under;
  • Any person who cannot safely wear a face covering because he/she has trouble breathing due to an underlying health condition or another bona fide medical or health-related reason for not wearing a face covering;
  • Anyone who is incapacitated or otherwise unable to remove a face covering without assistance;
  • Persons in a private residence;
  • Persons who are outdoors, unless the person cannot substantially maintain appropriate 6-foot social distancing from others outside of the person's household;
  • Persons while eating or drinking;
  • Persons in a place of worship or participating in any type of religious ceremony or activity attendant thereto (unless a face covering is required by the place of worship or other location where the religious ceremony is taking place), although persons in places of worship or otherwise participating in religious ceremonies or activities attendant thereto are strongly encouraged to wear face coverings to slow the spread of COVID-19;
  • Persons within private motor vehicles, unless such vehicle is being used for public transportation or a vehicle for hire;
  • Persons working under conditions where appropriate social distancing of at least six feet from others outside the person's household is substantially maintained;
  • Persons present in government facilities, or on government premises, who shall be subject to the rules and regulations of the governmental entity operating the facility or premises. • Persons present in the public areas of all Montgomery County government facilities will wear cloth or other face coverings, subject to the age and health restrictions outlined herein, and subject to number
  • Other local governmental entities may issue their own directives regarding their facilities;
  • Persons in a voting site for the purpose of voting or administering an election; although such persons are strongly encouraged to wear face coverings to slow the spread of COVID-19;
  • Persons who are engaging in strenuous exercise and/or physical activity, provided, however, that such persons shall maintain 6-foot social distancing when not wearing a face covering;
  • Persons for whom wearing a face covering would pose a safety or security risk;

Are local emergency orders enforceable by law?

Yes. In times of war, disease or other extraordinary conditions, each state authorizes its governor to declare a state of emergency. The COVID-19 pandemic is considered a health emergency.

Each governor has the right to authorize local mayors to issue executive orders, enforceable by law, which can be more stringent, not less stringent than state executive orders. Once an emergency has been declared, executive powers expand until the emergency ends.

Tennessee Code Annotated 58-8-104 states: once a local state of emergency has been declared, the mayor is given the authority to suspend the performance of public work and take whatever prudent action is necessary to ensure the health, safety, and welfare of the community. The local state of emergency under this statute is limited to 7 days, but it may be extended in 7-day increments.

Tennessee Code Annotated 58-2-120 states: any person violating any order, rule or regulation promulgated pursuant to a declaration of a state of emergency commits a Class A misdemeanor.

What should you do if someone is not in compliance with an executive order?

First ask them to comply and offer them a face-covering if you have one available. If they refuse to follow the mandate, call 911 and the dispatcher will create an emergency order violation and dispatch a unit. The goal for Montgomery County is working to achieve compliance and not issue a citation. However, the Clarksville Police Department and MCSO will issue citations, if needed.

Although state and local executive orders may seem to be new, the tools used for enforcement and the consequences for failing to comply are not new. Enforcement during declared states of emergency is appropriate.

Does wearing a face-covering in public violate my right to carry a concealed weapon?

There is NO prohibition for a person with a carry permit from wearing a mask as it relates to COVID-19. According to Tennessee law, "it is an offense for a person to wear a mask or disguise with the intent to intimidate others from exercising civil rights."

That's with or without a gun. To put this in perspective, anyone wearing a mask to try to hide your identity to intimidate others or commit a crime, that's illegal. But it is legal to wear a face covering and conceal carry for the purpose of stopping the spread of COVID-19.

Is wearing a mask a political issue?

No, wearing a mask is a health issue not a political issue. The capacity for health care professionals and equipment to care for people who contract the virus and experience severe upper respiratory problems is limited. The health and science communities agree that wearing a mask is the best way to slow the spread of the disease for the protection of everyone.

Does the CDC recommend wearing a face mask/covering?

On July 14, the CDC called on Americans to wear masks to prevent the spread of COVID-19 https://www.cdc.gov/media/releases/2020/p0714-americans-to-wear-masks.html

The CDC does recommend wearing a face mask/ covering. Their website states:

  • “You could spread COVID-19 to others even if you do not feel sick.
  • The cloth face cover is meant to protect other people in case you are infected.
  • Everyone should wear a cloth face cover in public settings and when around people who don’t live in your household, especially when other social distancing measures are difficult to maintain.
    • Cloth face coverings should not be placed on young children under age 2, anyone who has trouble breathing, or is unconscious, incapacitated or otherwise unable to remove the mask without assistance.
  • Do NOT use a facemask meant for a healthcare worker. Currently, surgical masks and N95 respirators are critical supplies that should be reserved for healthcare workers and other first responders.
  • Continue to keep about 6 feet between yourself and others. The cloth face cover is not a substitute for social distancing.”

Preamble

Pursuant to the authority in TCA 58-8-104, I, Montgomery County Mayor Jim Durrett, declared a State of Local Emergency on the 17th day of July 2020, granting to the County Mayor certain powers as allowed under TCA 58-2-110. This declaration gives political subdivisions of Tennessee State Government, Montgomery County, the ability to waive procedures relative to “performance of public works and taking whatever prudent action is necessary to ensure the health, safety and welfare of the community. I then issued EMERGENCY ORDER #11 on the same date.

Pursuant to those same statutes, I extend that Declaration of a state of emergency and further so ORDER the mandates of EMERGENCY ORDER(s) #11 for an additional seven days (7).

EMERGENCY ORDER # 12

  1. A Declaration of a State of Emergency for Montgomery County, Tennessee was made on July 17, 2020 and is hereby extended as allowed by law.
  2. Emergency Executive Order #11 of July 17, 2020 is extended and is adopted herein in full and extended as allowed by law.
  3. This ORDER shall become effective at 12:01 a.m. on the 27th day of July 2020 and will expire on August 3, 2020 at 12:01 a.m. unless sooner cancelled or unless extended.

It is so ORDERED, Mayor Jim Durrett, Montgomery County, Tennessee, this the 24th day of July 2020.

See official order here.

Preamble

While it is the hope and expectation that Montgomery County citizens will follow all suggested guidelines of the CDC to voluntarily reduce the spread of COVID-19, I issue this order pursuant to TCA §58-8-104 and 58-2-110 to take prudent action I believe necessary to ensure the health, safety, and welfare of the community.

The numbers of positive COVID-19 cases in Montgomery County and surrounding counties have significantly increased in the last thirty days; and

Widespread use of face coverings is a preferred alternative to the continued closure of schools and the closure of businesses in our community, which closures would likely become necessary if action is not taken; and

After consultation with the Mayor of the City of Clarksville and the School Superintendent of Montgomery County, the County Mayor finds that there is a consensus that the wearing of cloth or other face coverings should be required in certain circumstances, and that such a requirement should take effect as soon as possible.

Pursuant to those same originally named statutes, and the Governor’s Executive Order #54, I declare a state of emergency for Montgomery County, Tennessee and further so ORDER.

EMERGENCY ORDER # 11

  1. A Declaration of a State of Emergency for Montgomery County, Tennessee is made and may be extended as allowed by law and my Declaration of a State of Emergency is extended as set out herein.
  2. Emergency Executive Order # 9 and #10 are vacated.
  3. IT IS ORDERED that cloth or other face coverings that cover the nose and mouth of a person to impede the spread of the virus during speaking, coughing, sneezing or other action, shall be required in Montgomery County, Tennessee, within all publicly-accessible areas of commercial business establishments; in public outdoor areas where social distancing of at least six feet cannot be maintained; and within the publicly-accessible areas of business offices where there is direct interaction with the public and social distancing of at least six feet cannot be maintained. A "commercial business establishment" means any establishment that sells goods or services, or a combination thereof, including but not limited to grocery stores, restaurants, lobbies and public spaces in hotels and other places of lodging, pharmacies, banks, bars, salons, retail stores, medical and dental offices, and entertainment and sports venues.
  4. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that this Order does not apply to:
  5. Any person who is of age 12 or under;
  6. Any person who cannot safely wear a face covering because he/she has trouble breathing due to an underlying health condition or another bona fide medical or health-related reason for not wearing a face covering;
  7. Anyone who is incapacitated or otherwise unable to remove a face covering without assistance;
  8. Persons in a private residence;
  9. Persons who are outdoors, unless the person cannot substantially maintain appropriate 6-foot social distancing from others outside of the person's household;
  10. Persons while eating or drinking;
  11. Persons in a place of worship or participating in any type of religious ceremony or activity attendant thereto (unless a face covering is required by the place of worship or other location where the religious ceremony is taking place), although persons in places of worship or otherwise participating in religious ceremonies or activities attendant thereto are strongly encouraged to wear face coverings to slow the spread of COVID-19;
  12. Persons within private motor vehicles, unless such vehicle is being used for public transportation or a vehicle for hire;
  13. Persons working under conditions where appropriate social distancing of at least six feet from others outside the person's household is substantially maintained;
  14. 13. Persons present in government facilities, or on government premises, who shall be subject to the rules and regulations of the governmental entity operating the facility or premises. Persons present in the public areas of all Montgomery County government facilities will wear cloth or other face coverings, subject to the age and health restrictions outlined herein, and subject to number 11. Other local governmental entities may issue their own directives regarding their facilities;
  15. Persons in a voting site for the purpose of voting or administering an election; although such persons are strongly encouraged to wear face coverings to slow the spread of COVID-19;
  16. Persons who are engaging in strenuous exercise and/or physical activity, provided, however, that such persons shall maintain 6-foot social distancing when not wearing a face covering;
  17. Persons for whom wearing a face covering would pose a safety or security risk;
  18. This Order shall be effective upon issuance to protect and ensue the health, safety, and welfare of the Community.

IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that businesses and facilities subject to this Order shall post signage at public entrances informing patrons of the requirement to wear a mask within the establishment and shall enforce the requirement within the establishment.

This local order constitutes an order promulgated pursuant to Tennessee Code Annotated, Title 58, Chapter 2, Part 1.

This ORDER shall become effective at 12:01 a.m. on the 20th day of July 2020 and will expire on July 27, 2020 at 12:01 a.m., unless sooner cancelled or unless extended.

It is so ORDERED, Mayor Jim Durrett, Montgomery County, Tennessee, this the 17th day of July 2020.

See official order here.

Preamble

Pursuant to the authority in TCA 58-8-104, I, Montgomery County Mayor Jim Durrett, declared a State of Local Emergency on the 17th day of March 2020, granting to the County Mayor certain powers as allowed under TCA 58-2-110. That declaration gave political subdivisions of Tennessee State Government, Montgomery County, the ability to waive procedures relative to “performance of public works and taking whatever prudent action necessary to ensure the health, safety and welfare of the community”. I then issued eight EMERGENCY ORDERs. On April 24, 2020, the Governor of the State of Tennessee issued his EXECUTIVE ORDER # 29. That ORDER declared “This Order shall supersede and Preempt any emergency order, health order, or other order issued by a local official or local governmental entity addressing or otherwise related to COVID-19”. Based upon that Order, I allowed all my EMERGENCY ORDERs to expire.

Now, on July 3, 2020, Governor Bill Lee issued Executive Order #54 regarding the use of Face Masks and a grant of that authority to the 89 counties that do not have a locally run health department, which includes Montgomery County, to issue further Orders.

Pursuant to those same originally named statutes, and the Governor’s Executive Order #54, I declare a state of emergency and further so ORDER.

EMERGENCY ORDER # 10

  1. A Declaration of a State of Emergency is made and may be extended as allowed by law.
  2. My Declaration of a State of Emergency and my Emergency Executive Order # 9 issued on July 7, 2020 are adopted and extended.
  3. Term and effective date. This Order shall be effective at 12:01 a.m. July 15, 2020 and shall remain in effect for 7 days as allowed by law until 12:01 a.m., Central Daylight Time, on July 22, 2020 when it may be extended.
  4. This Order shall be effective upon issuance to protect and ensue the health, safety, and welfare of the Community.
  5. It is so ORDERED, Mayor Jim Durrett, Montgomery County, Tennessee, this the 14th day of July 2020.
It is so ORDERED, Mayor Jim Durrett, Montgomery County, Tennessee, this the 14th day of July 2020.

See official order here.

Montgomery and Robertson County General Sessions Court Judges Will Require Face Coverings in Court

MONTGOMERY COUNTY, Tenn. – Beginning Monday, July 13, 2020, a temporary policy that requires the wearing of face coverings for all persons in the courtrooms will go into effect for the 19th Judicial District.

The policy has been established by Jill Bartee Ayers, Presiding Judge 19th Judicial District, Ken Goble, Montgomery County General Sessions Court Presiding Judge and Joel Perry, Robertson County General Sessions Court Judge, and will remain in effect until August 1, 2020, unless otherwise extended, according to a memo that was shared from the judges.

The temporary policy will go into effect due to the rising number of COVID-19 cases in Montgomery and Robertson Counties, in order to protect those who use the court system and those who work in and around the court, consistent with the executive orders of the Montgomery County and Robertson County Mayors.

The memo states that the decision has been made regarding face coverings in the courtrooms of the 19th Judicial District. The court procedures for reopening which were approved by the TN Supreme Court will remain in full force with the addition of face coverings.

The following are exceptions to the temporary policy: face coverings may be temporarily removed by a witness who is giving testimony, by attorneys as they address the court, and judges and clerks seated in the courtroom during court who are adequately social distanced. Additionally, exceptions noted in the referenced executive orders will be recognized.

The memo further states that each judge will continue to have the authority to require face coverings to be worn at all times in his/her courtroom at his/her discretion. This policy will be announced in the courtrooms and any person after having been personally admonished by the court to wear a face-covering may be ordered to leave the premises and/or be punished for contempt. Each judge is charged with enforcement of the above in his/her courtroom.

The judges request that attorneys encourage their clients to bring and wear their own face coverings, however, the 19th Judicial District in conjunction with Montgomery and Robertson Counties will work diligently to provide face coverings for litigants who appear in the courtrooms without them. The memo also states that there may be times that the demand for face coverings may exceed supply.

Courts will continue to use technology to take up cases via video and teleconferences when possible. For more information about General Sessions Court in Montgomery County, visit https://mcgtn.org or call 931-648-5700.

Montgomery County Mayor Signs Emergency Order #9 for the Mandatory Wearing of Face Masks

MONTGOMERY COUNTY, Tenn. – Montgomery County Mayor Jim Durrett, signed Executive Executive Emergency Order #9 today to require the wearing of face masks by all employees of businesses open to the public in Montgomery County.

On Friday evening, July 3, Governor Bill Lee issued Executive Order #54 giving authority to county mayors to issue COVID-19 mask requirements. Montgomery County is one of 89 counties in the State of Tennessee that was given this authority. The mandate for businesses in Montgomery County to wear masks will go into effect at 12:01 a.m., July 8 and end July 15 with an expectation to extend the order at least another seven days through July 22, at which time an evaluation to further extend the orders will be determined. Emergency orders are valid for seven days and can be extended for seven-day periods.

Emergency Order #9 requires business employees to wear masks, unless social distancing can be conducted consistently. This order will be enforced on an as needed basis.

On Monday, July 6, Mayor Durrett and his Chief of Staff met with City Mayor Joe Pitts and his Chief of Staff, Montgomery County Health Department Director Joey Smith, and Director of Medical Services Jimmie Edwards to discuss the possibility of mask requirements.

“Based on the data we have seen our cases going up at a level that is uncomfortable. We know there is a “lag” in receiving testing data as more people are being testing. We must be proactive - so our first step is to require employees of businesses open to the public to wear face coverings. We are strongly encouraging all businesses to require patrons to wear a mask when visiting their business. We do not want to issue another stay at home order. Although some may feel this is encroaching on their freedoms, it is an effort to keep our local businesses open and our residents employed, while doing it in a safe manner,” Mayor Durrett stated. “Like many of you, I want to see our kids back in school, I want to enjoy a high school football game, a soccer game or a volleyball game. I want to see little league baseball and college football again. I want our children to have proms and graduations, skating parties and birthday parties. It really boils down to the young adults and children of this community having the opportunity to grow and prosper as we did, and also protecting the population that is more vulnerable to this virus. If it takes wearing a mask for all of this to happen, then we should all sacrifice a little for the gain of many. We must all remember - it’s not about me, it’s about we!”

"I applaud Mayor Durrett's willingness to issue this emergency order and will ask the City Council to meet in a special session on Tuesday afternoon to consider a resolution in support of the order. It is imperative we continue to work together to keep our citizens safe," said Clarksville Mayor Joe Pitts.

Health Department Director Joey Smith explained that testing numbers continue to increase which means there are hundreds of tests from people in Montgomery County waiting for results. The data will continue to be reviewed by local leaders and health officials who will follow the recommendations of the Center for Disease Control (CDC).

For more information about Montgomery County Services and COVID-19 information, visit https://mcgtn.org/ or call 931-648-5787.

Preamble

Pursuant to the authority in TCA 58-8-104, I, Montgomery County Mayor Jim Durrett, declared a State of Local Emergency on the 17th day of March 2020, granting to the County Mayor certain powers as allowed under TCA 58-2-110. That declaration gave political subdivisions of Tennessee State Government, Montgomery County, the ability to waive procedures relative to “performance of public works and taking whatever prudent action necessary to ensure the health, safety and welfare of the community”. I then issued eight EMERGENCY ORDERs. On April 24, 2020, the Governor of the State of Tennessee issued his EXECUTIVE ORDER # 29. That ORDER declared “This Order shall supersede and Preempt any emergency order, health order, or other order issued by a local official or local governmental entity addressing or otherwise related to COVID-19”. Based upon that Order, I allowed all my EMERGENCY ORDERs to expire.

Now, on July 3, 2020, Governor Bill Lee issued Executive Order #54 regarding the use of Face Masks and a grant of that authority to the 89 counties that do not have a locally run health department, which includes Montgomery County, to issue further Orders.

Pursuant to those same originally named statutes, and the Governor’s Executive Order #54, I declare a state of emergency and further so ORDER.

I personally urge all persons to consider the benefit of undertaking a practice of all CDC recommended precautions, as well as this ORDER, to prevent the further advancement of this extremely contagious and deadly virus. It has been damaging to our physical and mental health, our economy and our long-established way of life. All of our measures were taken only to execute the continued performance of public works and taking whatever prudent action was necessary to ensure the health, safety and welfare of the community. I appreciate the support of all citizens and acknowledge the hardships all have suffered in accepting these measures to protect us all.

“I” take these steps so that “we” can best assure ourselves of protecting each other; enhancing the likelihood and speed with which we can all return to fellowship, sports, families, friends, open our schools, teach our children and care for our fellow man as we did before this pandemic began. “We” can take these precautions and expedite the return to the way of life we have grown to enjoy and protect those among us that are most at risk from the virus.

EMERGENCY ORDER# 9

  1. A Declaration of a State of Emergency is made and may be extended as allowed by law.
  2. In accordance with CDC guidance, owners and persons employed in the operation of all public businesses are ORDERED to wear face coverings while conducting business. Such cloth face coverings can be created from household items or made at home from common materials at low cost. Cloth face coverings should not be placed on young children under age 2, anyone who has trouble breathing, or anyone who is incapacitated or otherwise unable to remove the mask without assistance. Surgical masks and N-95 respirators should be reserved for health care workers and first responders.
  3. There shall be no requirement that a face covering be worn:
    1. Within one’s residence or automobile, unless transporting others for hire;
    2. By a child twelve (12) years of age or younger;
    3. By someone who has trouble breathing due to an underlying health condition or another bona fide medical or health-related reason for not wearing a face covering;
    4. By someone who is incapacitated or otherwise unable to remove the cloth face covering without assistance;
    5. While eating or drinking;
    6. While outdoors, unless the person cannot substantially maintain appropriate social distancing from others outside of the person’s household;
    7. While working under conditions where appropriate social distancing from others outside of the person’s household is substantially maintained;
    8. In situations in which wearing a face covering poses a safety or security risk;
    9. While in a house of worship unless required by that house of worship, but wearing a face covering in such locations is strongly encouraged; or
    10. While in a voting site for the purpose of voting or administering an election, but wearing a face covering in such locations is strongly encouraged.
  4. All other persons are urged and encouraged, but not ORDERED, to wear face coverings in public places under these same guidelines above sections 2 and 3 (i through x) and practice all other CDC directives.
  5. Effect of Order. This is a local order promulgated under the authority delegated by this Order constitutes an order, rule, or regulation promulgated pursuant to Tennessee Code Annotated, Title 58, Chapter 2, Part 1, for purposes of Tennessee Code Annotated, Section 58-2-120.
  6. Severability. If any provision of this Order or its application to any person or circumstance is held invalid, the invalidity does not affect other provisions or applications of this Order which can be given effect without the invalid provision or application, and to that end the provisions of this Order are declared to be severable.
  7. The mandates in this ORDER cannot and do not modify amend, supplant, invalidate or void any existing ORDERS of the Governor of the State of Tennessee and the Tennessee Supreme Court.
  8. Term and effective date. This Order shall be effective at 12:01 am July 8, 2020 and shall remain in effect for 7 days as allowed by law until 12:00 p.m., Central Daylight Time, on July 15, 2020 when it may be extended.
  9. This Order shall be effective upon issuance to protect and ensue the health, safety, and welfare of the Community.
It is so ORDERED, Mayor Jim Durrett, Montgomery County, Tennessee, this the 6th day of July 2020.

See official order here.

Summary of Executive orders 50, 51 and 52

Executive Order No. 50
Executive Order No. 50 extends previous provisions that:

  • Urge Tennesseans to continue limiting activity and staying home where possible, as well as following health guidelines and maintaining social distancing;
  • Urge persons to wear a cloth face covering in places where in close proximity to others;
  • Urge employers to allow or require remote work/telework if possible;
  • Provide that persons with COVID-19 or COVID-19 symptoms are required to stay at home, and that employers may not require or allow employees with COVID-19 to work;
  • Limit social and recreational gatherings of 50 or more persons, unless adequate social distancing can be maintained (the 6 counties with locally run county health departments may issue different directives on gatherings)
    • This does not apply to places of worship, for which there are guidelines for safe operation of worship services and gatherings, though places of worship are urged to continue virtual or online services where possible;
    • continue virtual or online services where possible; This does not apply to weddings, funerals, and related events, but encourages postponement of large-gathering components of such events;
  • Limit contact sports with a requirement or substantial likelihood of routine close contact
    • This does not apply to collegiate or professional sports conducted under the rules or guidelines of their respective governing bodies and does not prohibit training or otherwise practicing the elements of such sports that do not involve close contact with persons;
  • Limit nursing home and long-term-care facility visitation, while providing a framework for safe, limited visitation set forth in Executive Order No. 49, and continue the closure of senior centers;
  • Provide that employers and businesses are expected to comply with the Governor’s Economic Recovery Group Guidelines (e.g., Tennessee Pledge) for operating safely, as well as general health guidelines from the CDC and other government entities (the 6 counties with locally run county health departments have authority to issue different directives on businesses/venues);
  • Provide that bars may only serve customers seated at appropriately spaced tables and must follow the Economic Recovery Group Guidelines (e.g., Tennessee Pledge) for restaurants (the 6 counties with locally run county health departments have authority to issue different directives on businesses/venues);
  • Urge persons and businesses to take special care to protect vulnerable populations, including by offering delivery or special shopping hours where possible;
  • Allow take-out and delivery alcohol sales by restaurants and limited-service restaurants to continue to encourage customers to utilize take-out or delivery options;
  • Allow broad access to telehealth services;
  • Increase opportunities for people to easily join the healthcare workforce;
  • Provide easier access to unemployment benefits;
  • Ensure supply chain protections;
  • Extend deadlines and suspend certain in-person continuing education or inspection requirements to avoid unnecessary person-to-person contact; and
  • Increase opportunities to work remotely where appropriate.
A more complete list of measures extended beyond June 30 to promote regulatory flexibility, facilitate social distancing and avoidance of large gatherings, and support supply chains and health care providers includes:
  • Health care licenses, certificates, and registrations are extended until August 31, 2020, and the number of health care professionals and facilities that are eligible for an extension is increased.
  • Degree holders in science fields can work as laboratory personnel under supervision. Allows more qualified graduates to work in medical laboratories.
  • Testing for COVID-19 can occur at more medical laboratory facilities. Allows for more widespread testing related to COVID-19.
  • Driver licenses and photo ID renewal deadlines are further extended. CDL license types remain extended until June 30, 2020; other types are extended until November 15, 2020. More people qualify for an extension.
  • Deadlines for payments to reinstate driver licenses are further extended. More people qualify for an extension.
  • Enhanced handgun carry permits are further extended through November 15, 2020. More people qualify for an extension.
  • Deadlines for persons with interlock ignition devices are further suspended. More people qualify for an extension.
  • Professional educational and training deadlines administered by the Department of Commerce and Insurance may be extended. The Department now has the authority to extend testing deadlines for regulated professions.
  • Activation of Tennessee Emergency Management Plan.
  • Out-of-state health care providers may practice in Tennessee.
  • Prescriptions available in 90-day supply.
  • Increased availability of home health services.
  • Notarization is not required for health care applications.
  • Retired medical professionals can easily reenter the health care workforce.
  • Continuing education requirements are suspended to allow health care professionals to receive such education through electronic means.
  • Laboratory inspections are suspended to allow for immediate COVID-19 testing.
  • Health care licensing inspections and investigations are suspended to increase resources available to fight COVID-19 and to protect public health.
  • Inspections of pain management clinics are suspended.
  • Inspections of health care facilities are suspended.
  • Inspections of medical laboratories are suspended.
  • Inspections of pharmaceutical facilities are suspended.
  • Inspections of veterinary facilities are suspended.
  • Live human patient examinations are suspended for dentistry applicants, and the Board of Dentistry may modify licensing procedures accordingly.
  • Memoranda of Understanding with the Department of Health to obtain confidential personal health information are enforceable emergency orders.
  • Nursing graduates may practice under supervision without examination.
  • Expanding locations for autopsies.
  • Pharmacists can process prescriptions remotely.
  • Each pharmacist can supervise more pharmacy technicians.
  • Medical laboratory directors can monitor facilities remotely.
  • Pre-license, post-degree mental or behavioral health professionals can provide telehealth services under supervision.
  • Medical laboratory personnel can work remotely.
  • Increased number of hospital beds available for COVID-19 patients.
  • Regulations of emergency medical services are suspended to increase services.
  • Temporary quarantine and isolation facilities may be constructed.
  • Size and weight transportation restrictions suspended for emergency supplies.
  • Transportation hours of service restrictions suspended for emergency supplies.
  • Certain criteria for unemployment benefits are suspended to ensure such benefits are available to COVID 19-affected employees.
  • Unemployment information from employers required more quickly to process benefits faster.
  • Child care licensure and assessment requirements are suspended to facilitate continued operation of child care facilities.
  • Examination cycle of financial institutions may be extended.
  • Deadline for TNInvestco annual audited financial statement reports extended until July 31, 2020.
  • Departments may extend deadlines to deposit state funds to protect state employees/customers.
  • Deadline for ethics filings is extended until July 15, 2020.
  • Deadlines for law enforcement training are extended.
  • Free copies of business entity filings available for those using them to seek state or federal disaster relief.
  • Board of Parole may modify procedures to protect public health.
  • Suspends temporary application of safety valve provisions resulting from the temporary decrease in TDOC prisoners.
  • Governor has discretion to utilize National Guard members in connection with TDOC operations if needed.
  • Motor vehicle dealers can record liens with the Secretary of State.
  • Administration of driving tests is suspended.
  • Issuance of REAL-ID is suspended.
  • Tennessee Corrections Institute transfer procedures are adjusted to respond to COVID-19.
  • Tennessee Corrections Institute may flexibly respond to COVID-19 issues.
  • Deadlines for building code and building plan inspections may be extended.
  • Notarization requirements for bonds and certain legal documents are suspended.
  • Deadline for firefighters to complete training may be extended.
  • Deadline for law enforcement and firefighter physical examinations is extended until October 1, 2020.
  • Deadline for peace officers to complete training may be suspended.
  • Annual meeting of the Tennessee Judicial Conference is suspended.
  • Time periods for completing securities registration requirements may be extended.
  • Remote shareholder meetings permitted under certain conditions.
  • Discretionary leave available for state employees affected by COVID-19.
  • Inspections of mental health and substance abuse facilities and services are suspended.
  • Telephone assessments for involuntary commitment cases are permitted.
  • TennCare policies adjusted to prevent coverage disruptions.
  • Limitations on emergency admissions to Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities facilities are suspended.
  • Medication administration certificates may be extended for Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities personnel.
  • Suspending requirements not feasible during COVID-19 pandemic to maintain service levels for persons supported by Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities.
  • Health insurance carriers encouraged to take steps necessary to maximize access to COVID- 19 treatment, screening, and testing.
  • Telemedicine access is expanded.
  • All licensed health care providers can practice telemedicine.
  • Tennessee Bureau of Investigation may conduct name-based background checks.
  • Deadline to remove expunged records is suspended.
Executive Order No. 51
Executive Order No. 16, as previously extended by Executive Order No. 34, which allows governing bodies to meet electronically regarding essential business as long as they provide electronic access to the public and meet the safeguards established in that order to ensure openness and transparency, is extended through August 29 to ensure that governmental entities are able to carry out essential business in a safe, transparent way without creating large gatherings in a confined space and endangering persons, particularly those at increased risk of suffering severe illness from COVID-19, while determinations of how best to return to safe, in-person governmental meetings remain ongoing.
Summary of Executive Order No. 52
Executive Order No. 26, as previously extended by Executive Order No. 37, which allows for remote notarization and witnessing of documents, subject to compliance with certain procedures, is extended through August 29 to ensure that persons, and particularly populations especially vulnerable to COVID-19, including older adults and persons with compromised immune systems or serious chronic medical conditions, can continue to engage in commerce and execute legal documents without requiring in-person contact.

See official order 50 here. see official order 51 here. see official order 52 here.

Governor Preempts Reopening Plan for Clarksville Montgomery County - Dine-in restaurants can open doors on Monday

April 27, 2020 - Communications Department

CLARKSVILLE, Tenn. – Gov. Bill Lee issued an executive order on Friday that will allow dine-in restaurants to resume operations Monday in Clarksville and Montgomery County.

The governor’s action preempts and cancels a local reopening plan and business permit process that was announced last week.

Lee announced his “Tennessee Pledge” on Friday, calling it the first step in a phased reopening of the state’s economy. The plan entails rebooting industries as they are safe to pursue in 89 of the state’s 95 counties, including Montgomery County. The state is working with Shelby, Madison, Davidson, Hamilton, Knox, and Sullivan, which have locally controlled health departments, on plans to reopen businesses in those counties.

Lee announced that Tennessee restaurants are able to reopen Monday, April 27 at 50 percent occupancy. Additionally, Tennessee retailers are able to reopen on Wednesday at 50 percent occupancy. The state recommends that employees in both industries wear cloth face coverings and that business owners follow federal guidelines for hygiene and workplace sanitation standards related to the pandemic.

The governor’s plan does not yet allow personal services business, such as barbers, hair stylists and nail salons to open.

The full guidance offered by the state for both sectors can be found at https://www.tn.gov/governor/covid-19/economic-recovery.html.

The governor’s order also included a provision that preempts a local reopening plan announced Thursday by Montgomery County Mayor Jim Durrett and City of Clarksville Mayor Joe Pitts.

“This Order shall supersede and preempt any emergency order, health order, or other order issued by a local official or local governmental entity addressing or otherwise related to COVID-19; provided, that the six locally run county health departments in Davidson, Hamilton, Knox, Madison, Shelby, or Sullivan Counties shall have the authority to maintain any existing order or issue further restrictions regarding the operation of restaurants for the purposes of containment or management of the spread of COVID-19,” Gov. Lee’s order states.

Mayor Durrett and Mayor Pitts and a team of staff members and local health officials had worked aggressively last week to build a local plan for reopening commercial activity in Clarksville-Montgomery County.

“Our local phased reopening and the operating permit process we intended to put into place will be set aside for now,” Mayor Pitts said Monday. “Further, our Executive Order No. 3 enacted by the City Council, which mandated business closings and stay-at-home measures, expires at midnight Tuesday, and will not be renewed. Our orders have been superseded by the Governor.”

“The governor’s lack of specifics in a timely manner put local governments in a reactive posture, instead of helping us help our community,” Mayor Pitts added.

Mayor Durrett also expressed frustration with the way the governor’s announcement unfolded.

“It’s unfortunate that the governor did not communicate his plans in advance,” Mayor Durrett said. “On April 20, he said, ‘the vast majority of businesses will be able to reopen by May 1st.’ So we worked like crazy to prepare for that, and then (Friday) he announced that restaurants and retail can open this week, and others have to wait. There must be better communication from our governor.”

Meanwhile, both mayors appealed to citizens to remain vigilant in the fight against COVID-19 by social distancing, using CDC hygiene practices, and wearing face coverings in public.

“Everyone must remember, we are not declaring victory, and we are still in a battle against COVID-19,” Mayor Pitts said. “Even as we strive to bring our community back to a reasonable level of activity, we must continue aggressive efforts to limit the spread of this serious disease.”

Montgomery County Mayor Extends Emergency Executive Orders through April 29

April 21, 2020 - Communications Department

MONTGOMERY COUNTY, Tenn. – Montgomery County Mayor Jim Durrett, signed Emergency Executive Order #7 for the extension of the declaration of the State of Emergency allowed under TCA 58-2-110, that went into effect March 17 as well as existing Emergency Executive Orders #1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 for an additional seven days.

This means that the original declaration of a State of Emergency, as well as the emergency orders that followed, have been extended, as allowed by law, for an additional seven days beginning April 22 at 12:01 a.m. and ending April 29, at which time evaluation to further extend the orders will be determined based on the information from the Whitehouse, the State of Tennessee and local healthcare professionals.

The only change is in Emergency Executive Order #3 that applies to the workweek for Montgomery County Government employees. In addition to the extension, this order states that county employees move to a 10-hour workday, four days a week from Monday through Thursday. Beginning Monday, April 27, county employees will go back to an 8-hour workday, Monday through Friday. The staggered staff schedule will be maintained, until further notice, to minimize contact and maintain social distancing.

“We are well-aware of Governor Lee’s Stay at Home order ending on April 30 and have been diligently working out a plan for Phase 1 of reopening. Once we have all the information in place and the expectations are clear, it will be shared with the public. In the meantime, it is critical for businesses as well as individuals do their part to minimize the spread of the coronavirus during this next week so we can move forward,” stated Mayor Durrett.

To review; the Declaration of the State of Emergency for Montgomery County and Emergency Executive Order #1 went into effect on March 17. Emergency Executive Order #1 limited public access to county buildings, reduced staff on-site and encouraged the use of online services. Emergency Executive Order #2, went into effect on March 23, extended the declaration of the State of Emergency and Emergency Order #2 while emending the order to support Governor Bill Lee’s Executive Order #17. Emergency Executive Order #3, issued March 24 extended the Declaration of the State of Emergency and Emergency Orders #1, #2 and adjusted the workweek for county employees. Emergency Executive Order #4, issued March 31, extended the Declaration of the State of Emergency and emergency orders #1, #2, and #3. Emergency Order #4 also directed citizens to shelter at home except when engaging in essential activities or services as described in the order and in addition to Governor Lee’s Executive Order #21. Emergency Executive Orders #5 and #6 are extensions of the previous orders.

Additionally, Governor Bill Lee’s statewide Safer at Home Order, (Executive Order #27) is valid through April 30.

For more information about Montgomery County Services and COVID-19 information, visit https://mcgtn.org/ or call 931-648-5787.

Beware of Scammers Related to COVID-19 Testing
Montgomery County Health Department Receives Calls of Concern

April 21, 2020 - Communications Department

MONTGOMERY COUNTY, Tenn. – The Montgomery County Health Department was made aware of multiple scammer calls that went out from the health department phone number today. The callers are contacting people to let them know they can receive the results of their COVID-19 test if they share their social security number.

The act of stealing a local or trusted number is known as spoofing. According to information on the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) website, spoofing occurs when a caller secures a number to purposely disguise themselves as a valid organization or individual in order to obtain valuable personal information from the person they call.

“The Montgomery County Health Department would never ask for your social security number. We will prompt you with questions that are related to your visit to the health department so you will know that it is us. We felt it was important to warn people these calls are being made so they can protect their personal information,” said Joey Smith, Director of the Montgomery Health Department.

For more information on how spoofing works, visit the FCC web site. For information about the Montgomery County Health Department, please visit their website.

Pursuant to the authority in TCA 58-8-104, I, Montgomery County Mayor Jim Durrett, declared a State of Local Emergency on the 17th day of March 2020, granting to the County Mayor certain powers as allowed under TCA 58-2-110. This declaration gives political subdivisions of Tennessee State Government, Montgomery County, the ability to waive procedures relative to “performance of public works and taking whatever prudent action is necessary to ensure the health, safety and welfare of the community”. I then issued EMERGENCY ORDER #1 on the same date. Subsequently, I issued EMERGENCEY ORDER #2 on March 23, 2020, and EMERGENCY ORDER #3 on March 24, 2020, Emergency Executive Order #4 of March 31, 2020, Emergency Executive ORDER #5 on April 7, 2020 and Emergency Executive Order #6 of April 14, 2020.

Pursuant to those same statutes, I extend that Declaration of a state of emergency and further so ORDERED the mandates of EMERGENCY ORDER(s) #1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 for an additional seven days (7) with EMERGENCY ORDER #7, except as amended to return county employees to a Five Day work week.

I am extending this ORDER on these terms, pending the guidelines to be established by the State of Tennessee according to Governor Lee’s announcement on April 20th. In that announcement he indicated the re-opening of the State of Tennessee as early as April 27th, or on May 1st. I have the ability to cancel or amend this local order at any time deemed appropriate and will act when I see and review the guidance indicated by the Governor in his ORDER.

EMERGENCY EXECUTIVE ORDER # 7

  1. The Original Declaration of a State of Emergency made on March 17, 2020 is extended as allowed by law.
  2. Subsequently ORDERs of County Mayor Durrett being EMERGENCY ORDER #1 on March 17, 2020, EMERGENCEY ORDER #2 on March 23, 2020, and EMERGENCY ORDER #3 on March 24, 2020, Emergency Executive Order #4 of March 31, 2020, Emergency Executive ORDER #5 on April 7, 2020 and Emergency Executive Order #6 of April 14, 2020 are adopted herein in full and extended as allowed by law.
  3. The earlier ORDERED Four (4) day “work week” for Montgomery County Employees is withdrawn. All county offices will return to a regular work week beginning April 27, 2020 with the same limited staffing. Offices are closed to the public but functioning as they are now.
  4. The mandates in each ORDER are not applicable to those entities identified by their work or services as critical infrastructure industry(s) as defined by the Department of Homeland Security, such as healthcare services, pharmaceutical and food supply. The Mandates in this Order cannot and do not invalidate or void any existing ORDERS of the Governor of the State of Tennessee and the Tennessee Supreme Court currently in effect but add additional mandatory operational guidelines and responsibilities for those businesses to continue to operate.
  5. This EMERGENCY EXECUTIVE ORDER #7 shall be effective and enforceable at 12:01 AM, Central Daylight Time, on April 22, 2020, and shall remain in effect until 12:01 a.m., Central Daylight Time, on April 29, 2020, at which time the same will be extended, amended or otherwise addressed.
  6. This Order shall be effective upon issuance to protect and ensure the health, safety, and welfare of the Community.

It is so ORDERED, Mayor Jim Durrett, this the 21st day of April 2020.

See official order here.

Archived Press Releases and Information Click Here

Community Coronavirus Press Releases and Information

Tax Relief Deadlines Have Been Extended by State Comptroller’s Office

April 2, 2020 - Communications Department

MONTGOMERY COUNTY, Tenn. – The Montgomery County Trustee’s Office was informed by the Tennessee State Comptroller’s Office that Tenn. Code Ann. § 28-1-116 (2017), that originally covered court proceedings, now covers tax relief deadlines.

This means property tax relief and tax freeze applications that were originally due back to the Trustee’s office on April 6th have been extended to May 6, 2020. Therefore, the deadline for applicants to submit their applications to the Montgomery County Trustee’s Office is May 6th

“It makes my heart happy that this extension is being offered to the disabled, elderly, veterans and surviving spouses of our veterans. We are working diligently to offer tax relief to those who need it most,” said Montgomery County Trustee Kimberly Wiggins.

Last week the Trustee’s Office issued 252 tax relief checks totaling $37,584, this week another 122 checks have been issued so far, totaling $14,521 and there are approximately 130 additional checks to be issued for about $17,000 on Monday.

“We want to ensure that those who meet the qualifications can benefit from the tax relief and have this supplement as quickly as possible as approved through our county commission. It is our privilege to assist those who may need it most in these difficult times,” added Wiggins.

For questions about tax relief or tax freeze in Montgomery County, please visit https://mcgtn.org/trustee or call 931-648-5717.

President Donald J. Trump is Providing Economic Relief to American Workers, Families, and Businesses Impacted by The Coronavirus

“The legislation developed in the Senate is the first step to restoring confidence and stability to America's economy.” – President Donald J. Trump
SECURING EMERGENCY RELIEF: President Donald J. Trump is signing bipartisan legislation to provide relief to American families and workers during the coronavirus outbreak.
  • The President worked with Congress to secure bipartisan legislation that will provide emergency relief to families and small businesses that have been impacted by the coronavirus.
    • This unprecedented relief package totals more than $2 trillion.
  • The CARES Act provides much needed economic relief for American families and businesses who are hurting through no fault of their own.
  • This legislation will provide assistance to America’s heroic healthcare workers who are on the frontlines of this outbreak.
    • $100 billion will go to healthcare providers, including hospitals on the front lines of the COVID-19 pandemic.
    • $27 billion will go to bolstering life-saving capabilities, including developing vaccines and the development, purchase, and distribution of critical supplies.
    • $45 billion will go to the Federal Emergency Management Agency Disaster Relief Fund, more than doubling the amount available to support the President’s Emergency and Disaster Declarations to empower State, local, and tribal leaders to effectively respond.
SUPPORTING FAMILIES: This legislative package brings security to American families by providing them with economic assistance during this time of crisis.
  • This legislation provides tax free payments—treated as a refundable tax credit—to Americans, giving families the immediate financial support they need.
    • Couples earning up to $150,000 will receive $2,400, plus an additional $500 for each child.
    • Individuals earning up to $75,000 will receive $1,200, plus an additional $500 for each child.
    • These payments will phase out for those earning over $75,000, $112,500 for head of household filers, and $150,000 for married couples filing joint tax returns.
  • The legislation provides much needed assistance to Americans out of work.
    • The CARES Act allows States to temporarily increase unemployment benefits and receive Federal reimbursement for the additional amount.
    • Encourages States to waive the typical one week waiting period and provides an additional 13 weeks of benefits
    • Creates a new program to assist the self-employed and independent contractors who are unemployed due to the pandemic.
  • The legislation provides relief for homeowners and renters, ensuring that Americans’ homes are not threatened by the coronavirus.
    • Enables payment forbearance for federally backed mortgages, requires a foreclosure and eviction moratorium for homeowners with such mortgages, and imposes an eviction moratorium for renters in federally supported housing.
  • Suspends penalties for withdrawing up to $100,000 from retirement accounts.
  • Allows a high-deductible health plan with a health savings account to cover telehealth services prior to a patient reaching the deductible.
  • The legislation provides $3.5 billion in emergency funding to our child care providers to stay open, keep payroll, and prioritize the child care needs of healthcare, emergency, and sanitation workers all across our country.
BOLSTERING THE ECONOMY: This legislation will strengthen our economy by providing needed financial assistance to America’s small businesses and workers.
  • Small businesses that have been hurt by coronavirus will receive the help they need to survive and prosper.
  • This legislation provides small businesses and nonprofits comprised of 500 or fewer employees with almost $350 billion in partially forgivable loans.
    • The maximum loan amount for 7(a) business loans will be temporarily increased.
    • This legislation also provides $17 billion to forgive 6 months of payments on any existing Small Business Administration non-disaster loans.
  • The CARES Act provides critical payroll tax relief for small businesses.
  • The legislation expands the emergency disaster loan program by funding $10 billion in advances on loan applications to rapidly help small businesses cover expenses including sick leave, payroll, and rent.
  • Businesses adversely affected by the coronavirus are eligible for a tax credit of $5,000 for wages paid to each employee.
  • The CARES Act includes $500 billion for the Treasury and Federal Reserve to provide liquidity and purchase business, municipal, and State debt.
    • If needed, the Federal Reserve can leverage funds of more than $4 trillion in financial support during this time of disaster.

Paycheck Protection Program FAQs for Small Businesses

Where can I apply for the Paycheck Protection Program?

You can apply for the Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) at any lending institution that is approved to participate in the program through the existing U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) 7(a) lending program and additional lenders approved by the Department of Treasury. This could be the bank you already use, or a nearby bank. There are thousands of banks that already participate in the SBA’s lending programs, including numerous community banks. You do not have to visit any government institution to apply for the program. You can call your bank or find SBA-approved lenders in your area through SBA’s online Lender Match tool. You can call your local Small Business Development Center or Women’s Business Center and they will provide free assistance and guide you to lenders.

Who is eligible for the loan?

You are eligible for a loan if you are a small business that employs 500 employees or fewer, or if your business is in an industry that has an employee-based size standard through SBA that is higher than 500 employees. In addition, if you are a restaurant, hotel, or a business that falls within the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code 72, “Accommodation and Food Services,” and each of your locations has 500 employees or fewer, you are eligible. Tribal businesses, 501(c)(19) veteran organizations, and 501(c)(3) nonprofits, including religious organizations, will be eligible for the program. Nonprofit organizations are subject to SBA’s affiliation standards. Independently owned franchises with under 500 employees, who are approved by SBA, are also eligible. Eligible franchises can be found through SBA’s Franchise Directory.

I am an independent contractor or gig economy worker, am I eligible?

Yes. Sole proprietors, independent contractors, gig economy workers, and self-employed individuals are all eligible for the Paycheck Protection Program.

What is the maximum amount I can borrow?

The amount any small business is eligible to borrow is 250 percent of their average monthly payroll expenses, up to a total of $10 million. This amount is intended to cover 8 weeks of payroll expenses and any additional amounts for making payments towards debt obligations. This 8 week period may be applied to any time frame between February 15, 2020 and June 30, 2020. Seasonal business expenses will be measured using a 12-week period beginning February 15, 2019, or March 1, 2019, whichever the seasonal employer chooses.

How can I use the money such that the loan will be forgiven?

The amount of principal that may be forgiven is equal to the sum of expenses for payroll, and existing interest payments on mortgages, rent payments, leases, and utility service agreements. Payroll costs include employee salaries (up to an annual rate of pay of $100,000), hourly wages and cash tips, paid sick or medical leave, and group health insurance premiums. If you would like to use the Paycheck Protection Program for other business-related expenses, like inventory, you can, but that portion of the loan will not be forgiven.

When is the loan forgiven?

The loan is forgiven at the end of the 8-week period after you take out the loan. Borrowers will work with lenders to verify covered expenses and the proper amount of forgiveness.

What is the covered period of the loan?

The covered period during which expenses can be forgiven extends from February 15, 2020 to June 30, 2020. Borrowers can choose which 8 weeks they want to count towards the covered period, which can start as early as February 15, 2020.

How much of my loan will be forgiven?

The purpose of the Paycheck Protection Program is to help you retain your employees, at their current base pay. If you keep all of your employees, the entirety of the loan will be forgiven. If you still lay off employees, the forgiveness will be reduced by the percent decrease in the number of employees. If your total payroll expenses on workers making less than $100,000 annually decreases by more than 25 percent, loan forgiveness will be reduced by the same amount. If you have already laid off some employees, you can still be forgiven for the full amount of your payroll cost if you rehire your employees by June 30, 2020.

Am I responsible for interest on the forgiven loan amount?

No, if the full principal of the PPP loan is forgiven, the borrower is not responsible for the interest accrued in the 8-week covered period. The remainder of the loan that is not forgiven will operate according to the loan terms agreed upon by you and the lender.

What are the interest rate and terms for the loan amount that is not forgiven?

The terms of the loan not forgiven may differ on a case-by-case basis. However, the maximum terms of the loan feature a 10-year term with interest capped at 4 percent and a 100 percent loan guarantee by the SBA. You will not have to pay any fees on the loan, and collateral requirements and personal guarantees are waived. Loan payments will be deferred for at least six months and up to one year starting at the origination of the loan.

When is the application deadline for the Paycheck Protection Program?

Applicants are eligible to apply for the PPP loan until June 30th, 2020.

I took out a bridge loan through my state, am I eligible to apply for the Paycheck Protection Program?

Yes, you can take out a state bridge loan and are still be eligible for the PPP loan.

If I have applied for, or received an Economic Injury Disaster Loan (EIDL) related to COVID- 19 before the Paycheck Protection Program became available, will I be able to refinance into a PPP loan?

Yes. If you received an EIDL loan related to COVID-19 between January 31, 2020 and the date at which the PPP becomes available, you would be able to refinance the EIDL into the PPP for loan forgiveness purposes. However, you may not take out an EIDL and a PPP for the same purposes. Remaining portions of the EIDL, for purposes other than those laid out in loan forgiveness terms for a PPP loan, would remain a loan. If you took advantage of an emergency EIDL grant award of up to $10,000, that amount would be subtracted from the amount forgiven under PPP.

The Small Business Owner’s Guide to the CARES Act

March 27, 2020 - Communications Department

The programs and initiatives in the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act that was just passed by Congress are intended to assist business owners with whatever needs they have right now. When implemented, there will be many new resources available for small businesses, as well as certain non-profits and other employers. This guide provides information about the major programs and initiatives that will soon be available from the Small Business Administration (SBA) to address these needs, as well as some additional tax provisions that are outside the scope of SBA.

CARE Act Information PDF

Emergency TANF Cash Assistance
Unemployment Insurance Benefits

Montgomery County Testing Locations

Please refer to the testing guidelines of the CDC if you believe you should be tested.

Vanderbilt Primary Care Clarksville
800 Weatherly Drive, Suite 201B
Clarksville, TN 37043
Phone: 615-875-4036

Montgomery County Health Department
350 Pageant Lane
Clarksville, TN 37040
Phone: 931-648-5747

Premier Medical Group – Walk In Clinic
490 Dunlop Lane
Clarksville, TN 37040
931-245-7000

Community Resource Updates Due to COVID-19

Food Pantries

Urban Ministries:Drive through Food Pantry: Friday, March 20 from 3 p.m. – 7 p.m. at Madison Street United Methodist Church parking lot from 3ring photo ID and proof of residence.

Clarksville-Montgomery County School System The following schools will be serving food from 10 a.m. to noon March 20:

  • Elementary, 110 Bailey Street
  • Byrns Darden Elementary- 609 E Street
  • Glenellen Elementary- 825 Needmore Road
  • Moore Elementary- 1350 Madison Street
  • Ringgold Elementary- 240 Ringgold Road
  • Kenwood High School- 251 East Pine Mountain Road
  • Montgomery Central High School -3955 Highway 48
  • Northeast High School -3701 Trenton Road
  • Northwest High School - 800 Lafayette Road
  • West Creek High School - 1210 West Creek Coyote Trail

Manna Cafe Ministries:Until further notice, details are as follows:Food distribution will continue Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays 10 a.m. – 4p.m. Clients will be accepted into the lobby 10 at a time, to limit interaction.Hot meals will be served Tuesday and Wednesday mornings at the village community center and Thursday and Saturday mornings at Christ the Healer Church and the community center but will be distributed as to-go boxes only. Additionally, hot meals will be provided Wednesday and Thursday evenings at the village community center. The Village Community Center is located at 503 D. Street in Manna Village and Christ the Healer Church is located at 1295 Paradise Hill Road.Programs such as Change for Change and Operation Pomegranate are temporarily on hold.

Church food pantries:Grace Lutheran Church- come to back or side door call number and they will bring it to you First Church of Nazarene - (9:30 - 12:45) business as usual.

CAA Commodities:Please call and schedule a pick-up time 931-896-1800. Food boxes will be provided at the Lafayette Rd location.

Small Business Loans

March 20, 2020 - TN Department of Economic & Community Development

Loans now available to Tennessee small businesses that have suffered economic injury as a result of COVID-19

NASHVILLE, Tenn. – Today, Gov. Bill Lee announced that Tennessee has received a declaration for Economic Injury Disaster Loan assistance from the U.S. Small Business Administration in response to a request submitted on Wednesday, March 18.

“I applaud the efforts of the SBA in swiftly processing and approving Tennessee’s request for Economic Injury Disaster Loan assistance,” Lee said. “Small businesses and nonprofits across the state are suffering greatly in the wake of this pandemic, and these loans will help overcome the temporary loss of revenue companies are experiencing during this difficult time.”

Small businesses and nonprofit organizations that have suffered economic injury as a result of COVID-19 can apply for Economic Injury Disaster Loans of up to $2 million per applicant to help meet financial obligations and operating expenses which could have otherwise been met.

The Economic Injury Disaster Loans are administered and processed through the SBA. Applicants may apply online, receive additional disaster assistance information and download applications at sba.gov/disaster.

Applicants may also call SBA’s Customer Service Center at (800) 659-2955 or email [email protected] for more information on SBA disaster assistance.

Interest rates for the loans are 3.75% for small businesses and 2.75% for nonprofit organizations. The loans can be used to pay fixed debts, payroll, accounts payable or other bills that can’t be paid due to the disaster’s impact.

“We have been in contact with business and community leaders across the state who are concerned about the toll COVID-19 is placing on their businesses and workforce,” TNECD Commissioner Bob Rolfe said. “We are pleased to see that these loans will act as a source of relief for so many of Tennessee’s small businesses in the months ahead.”

The SBA offers loans with long-term repayments in order to keep payments affordable, up to a maximum of 30 years. Terms are determined on a case-by-case basis, based upon each borrower’s ability to repay.

More than 94 percent of Tennessee’s private sector business establishments have fewer than 50 employees. This represents 151,500 businesses that employ over one million Tennesseans.

Employment has increased 13.6 percent at these establishments over the last five years, placing Tennessee in the nation’s top 10 states for small business growth.

Small businesses are encouraged to learn more about resources offered by the U.S. Small Business Administration at https://www.sba.gov/.

Information about the SBA’s District Office in Tennessee can be found here.

Up-to-date information on COVID-19 in Tennessee can be found here.

TNECD Media Contact

Jennifer McEachern, Communications Director
(615) 336-2689
[email protected]

About the Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development

The Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development’s mission is to develop strategies that help make Tennessee the No. 1 location in the Southeast for high quality jobs. To grow and strengthen Tennessee, the department seeks to attract new corporate investment to the state and works with Tennessee companies to facilitate expansion and economic growth. Find us on the web: tnecd.com. Follow us on Twitter and Instagram: @tnecd. Like us on Facebook: facebook.com/tnecd.

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